1 Dakazahn

Essay On Attitude Towards Teachers

Teacher Attitudes Towards Inclusion Essay

In summary, research indicates positive shift in attitudes toward inclusion and can be fostered by teacher education in a variety of aspects pertaining to inclusion including increased administrative support, co-teaching, support from special education teachers and paraprofessionals, adequate resources to meet the needs of a wide variety of learners, and time for making accommodations, modifications, and planning (DeSimone and Parmar, 2006; Daane et al., 2008; Elliot, 2008; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010; Jung, 2007). Novice teachers get much needed training and hands on experience in their coursework and practicum (Algaryouti et al., 2003; Berry, 2008; Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Burke & Sutherland, 2004; Jung). Researchers found experienced teachers to have less than favorable attitudes toward inclusion when compared to their novice teacher peers due to lack of training and experience in inclusive practices (Algaryouti et al.; Berry; Burke & Sutherland; Brady, 2008; Cook et al., 2007; DeSimone & Parmar; Gojkovic, 2007).
Recent research has been conducted to identify preservice and in-service teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion (Algaryouti et al., 2003; Berry, 2008; Brady, 2008; Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Bruke & Sutherland, 2004; Carter, Prater, Jackson, & Marchant, 2009; Cook, Cameron, & Tankersley, 2007; Daane, Lusk, Thompson, 2008; DeSimone & Parmar, 2006; Elliot, 2008; Gojkovic, 2007; Gugur &Uzuner, 2010; Jensen, McCrary, Krampe, & Cooper, 2004; Jung, 2007; Short & Martin, 2005; Smith & Smith, 2000); examine the influence teacher preparation programs, coursework, and practicum experience have on novice teacher attitudes toward included students with disabilities (Algaryouti et al.; Berry; Brakenreed & Barnett; Burke; Jung) and ways to increase inservice teachers’ attitudes of inclusive teaching (Daane, Lusk, & Thompson; DeSimone & Parmar; Elliot; Gurgur &Uzuner; Smith & Smith). Many of these studies suggest teacher attitudes toward inclusion are the most important aspect of inclusive teaching (Berry; Brakenreed & Barnett; Burke & Sutherland; Daane, Lusk, & Thompson; Gojkovic; Elliot).
Further, research has been done to determine how these attitudes affect the views these inclusive teachers hold of students with disabilities and their willingness to work collaboratively to meet the needs of included students (Algaryouti et al., 2003; DeSimone & Parmar, 2006; Daane et al., 2008; Gojkovic, 2007; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010; Jensen et al., 2004; Jung, 2007). The findings suggest preservice teachers and novice teachers approach inclusive teaching with a positive mindset but are reluctant to seek auxiliary support, likely due to their lack of secure teaching craft (Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Jung, 2007). In contrast to the positive attitudes of novice and preservice teachers, in-service teachers have a more negative view toward inclusion; however, a positive correlation exists between an increase in auxiliary support and more favorable attitudes toward...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Inclusion Essay

944 words - 4 pages The article Effective Inclusion Professional Development in the Context of the Classroom was written by Howard M. Weiner and appeared in TEACHING Exceptional Children, Vol. 35, No. 6 pp. 12-18. July/August 2003. In this article, the author discussed Inclusive Education Teacher Support to meet the needs of all students. He explains that one of the...

Students with Disabilities Essay

2152 words - 9 pages ‘Inclusion of students with disabilities into mainstream schools is a worldwide trend’ (Sharma, Forlin & Loreman, 2008, p.773) yet, Australia is amongst one of the last developed countries to introduce inclusive practices (Anderson, Klassen & Georgiou, 2007). Which seems quite unbelievable considering students with disabilities attending mainstream school is on a remarkable increase, jumping 11 percent in 1995 to 1996 alone. Before the...

Inclusion in the Classroom: It's Not Worth It.

1672 words - 7 pages The education of children with special need has been carried out in a designated classroom or by inclusion into a general classroom. Inclusion has been defined as "the placement and education of students with disabilities in general education classrooms with students of the same age who do not have disabilities"(Reynolds 928). Debate about inclusion or separate classrooms for children with disabilities has been a topic of discussion in...

The Positive Effects of Inclusion of Special Education Students

2196 words - 9 pages Introduction Special education has undergone immense changes through the years. Research and studies on the debate of whether or not inclusion is appropriate for special education students is just beginning to cultivate. The question has always been, what is best for these students? Schools and teachers are becoming leaders in the exploration of new paths, in search of new teaching styles and techniques. Mainstreaming or inclusion at the...

The Difficulties of Hearing Loss in Education

1303 words - 5 pages The people in the following list all have something in common: Whoopi Goldberg, Pete Townshend (lead guitarist of The Who), Huey Lewis, Helen Keller, Ludwig Van Beethoven, and Thomas Edison. If you were unable to guess, all of these people had a hearing loss. In terms of formal definition, a hearing loss is, “a spectrum of disorders causing a disruption or distortion of auditory information reaching or being processed by the central nervous...

Teachers' Attitudes Toward Inclusion

597 words - 2 pages The study by Burke and Sutherland (2004) was conducted to ascertain if experiences with disabled students determine a teachers’ attitude toward inclusion. The attitude of teachers involved in classes that include special needs students may determine the success or failure of any inclusion program. The teacher who will adapt the curriculum and his/her own teaching style to meet the needs of all students in the class, will have a better chance of...

Inclusive Education

1469 words - 6 pages Personally I feel, that before attempting to find out whether our country understands and applies the concept of inclusion to its educational system, it is more adequate to try and understand the meaning of Inclusion, a complex issue which creates continuous debates. In the book Creating Inclusive Classrooms, J. Spencer Salend defines inclusion as : “[…] a philosophy that brings diverse students, families, educators and community members...

Principles, Policies & Frameworks of Inclusive Schooling

1121 words - 4 pages Briefly discuss how you believe policies and legislation related to Inclusive Education could influence attitudes towards the way society accepts difference. In recent times I believe there has been a heightened awareness regarding the necessity to develop Inclusive Classrooms that celebrate difference and cater for a diverse range of learning styles and needs. My belief is reflected in the increasing amount of policies and legislation being...

Research Report

1040 words - 4 pages Research Report In the past, disabled students—students with physical and emotional/behavioral problems—were often segregated from the “normal classroom environments.” The segregation of students, either through special schools or home-based tutoring, was justified for various reasons. Separate schools provided specialized services, tailored to meet the educational needs of children with a specific type of handicap. Moreover, this freed the...

Teaching Physical Education

2433 words - 10 pages Teaching Physical Education I believe that in many circumstances and in differing situations, children's emotions and discomforts are being over looked in the physical education setting. Ideally a teacher would like to have all their students, as well rounded as possible, as far as intellectually, emotionally and physically. I am afraid it is almost impossible these days, with the influx of divorce, widening gap in socioeconomic status,...

Equitable learning opportunities for children with disabilities

2041 words - 8 pages Rochelle Standing 1081780For many years researchers have studied families of children with disabilities attempting to cast light on the important aspects and the complexities of providing equitable learning opportunities in education including the benefits and characteristics of working together in partnerships with parents and whānau in terms their child's care and education. Collaborative parental partnerships are certainly not a...

Essay on Teacher Attitudes Towards Inclusion

1289 Words6 Pages

In summary, research indicates positive shift in attitudes toward inclusion and can be fostered by teacher education in a variety of aspects pertaining to inclusion including increased administrative support, co-teaching, support from special education teachers and paraprofessionals, adequate resources to meet the needs of a wide variety of learners, and time for making accommodations, modifications, and planning (DeSimone and Parmar, 2006; Daane et al., 2008; Elliot, 2008; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010; Jung, 2007). Novice teachers get much needed training and hands on experience in their coursework and practicum (Algaryouti et al., 2003; Berry, 2008; Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Burke & Sutherland, 2004; Jung). Researchers found experienced…show more content…

Many of these studies suggest teacher attitudes toward inclusion are the most important aspect of inclusive teaching (Berry; Brakenreed & Barnett; Burke & Sutherland; Daane, Lusk, & Thompson; Gojkovic; Elliot).
Further, research has been done to determine how these attitudes affect the views these inclusive teachers hold of students with disabilities and their willingness to work collaboratively to meet the needs of included students (Algaryouti et al., 2003; DeSimone & Parmar, 2006; Daane et al., 2008; Gojkovic, 2007; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010; Jensen et al., 2004; Jung, 2007). The findings suggest preservice teachers and novice teachers approach inclusive teaching with a positive mindset but are reluctant to seek auxiliary support, likely due to their lack of secure teaching craft (Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Jung, 2007). In contrast to the positive attitudes of novice and preservice teachers, in-service teachers have a more negative view toward inclusion; however, a positive correlation exists between an increase in auxiliary support and more favorable attitudes toward inclusion (Daane et al., 2008; DeSimone & Parmar, 2006; Gurgur & Uzuner, 2010). Research supports the positive change in novice teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion as a direct result of the focus shift in teacher preparation programs (Algaryouti et al., 2003; Berry, 2008; Brakenreed & Barnett, 2006; Gojkovic, 2007; Jung, 2007). Increases in special

Show More

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *